“The Crossers” series continues with “Return to the Valley”

SUNBURY PRESS BOOKS

MECHANICSBURG, Pa. — Sunbury Press has released “Return to the Valley,” Terry Ray’s fifth installment in “The Crossers” series.

About the Book:
crossers5_fcReturn to the Valley picks up the story, ten years after the conclusion of the epic American Classic Series, Crossing the Valley. The main character, Marty Chapman, has settled into a happy, normal, family life as a college professor in a small town in Kansas and seems to have finally found contentment. As in the original series, however, Marty is not destined for such a life.

This continuing epic, once again, traverses the complete spectrum of human emotions and life experiences that will leave the reader transfixed and in awe.

This story winds its way through romantic love and family bliss, to the revealing inside story of the treacherous, back-stabbing, real world of university faculty, to pure evil, blackmailing co-eds, homicide and the anatomy of a sensational…

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Rommel’s Genuine Suspense Leads Him From the Page to Hollywood

Keith Rommel is an award winning author of 13 novels, and award winning screenwriter of upcoming films The Cursed Man, The Lurking Man and The Sinful Man. His writing had been called “horror for the curious mind,” and “thinking mans horror.” It has garnished awards such as best novel of the year to 5 star Readers Favorite awards.

the-cursed-man

Interview with Susan Kiskis

The film version of his novel, The Cursed Man, has already won two awards, semi-finalist in Cinefest and finalist at the Terror Film Festival for Best Screenplay. It releases this month. We had the opportunity to ask Rommel some questions about his writing inspiration, his upcoming film and what’s next on his to-do list.

The first book in your Thanatology Series, The Cursed Man, has been adapted into a movie and set to premier on Halloween. What drew you to write The Cursed Man and when doing so, did you know it would be part of a series?

I actually had no idea. Upon completion of writing the novel The Cursed Man, I had decided I wanted the story to continue. Without any clear direction of what was next, I spent many nights staying up late, searching for a series name. As one might notice, without clear direction, naming something that has not yet been created was quite difficult. Thanatology, the series name, merely came to me after I decided that I should describe the series by its theme.

You co-wrote the screenplay for The Cursed Man. Was that your first time writing for screen? What was the process like for you and how did it differ from writing a novel?

I had dabbled in screenwriting and comic book script writing in the late 90’s as merely an interest. Unfortunately, none of my original writings exist, but thankfully some of my know-how remained.

The process of writing a screenplay can be a simple one, or complex, depending on the text it’s being adapted from. In the case of The Cursed Man, or most any of my novels, I write from a theatrical point of view. Short punchy dialogue with brief descriptions to keep the stories moving quickly. This makes adaptation a little easier. Where I ran into trouble was shrinking the story down to fit onto screen. This means some of the things people are familiar with in The Cursed Man novel, will not be on screen, due to timing and pace. When writing a novel, you have the freedom to explain and express without limitations. In screenwriting, you have 90-110 pages with a lot of centered, confined margins. Movie dialogue eats up a lot of those precious pages.

Thanatology is a study of death, death practices and the terminally ill. Was that a guiding post for this series?

Absolutely. I’ve always had a fascination with death. I would probably consider it to be more of a fear than a hankering to see a corpse; that kind of grosses me out. This fear has allowed me to write magnificent stories throughout the Thanatology Series that send a very powerful message about life. Yes. Life is hard. And there is so much drama around us. But, if you were given a chance… a second chance, or a way to show others that what you did in your life leads to something that might be tragic, horrific, have a long-lasting impact on everyone around you, wouldn’t you like to receive that message?

Also, a small tidbit about the Thanatology Series, that most people might not know, is that every story in the series, that is currently available, is based off of someone’s real life events.

When did you start writing and was the goal always to write books?

I started writing when I was in my early 20’s. To be blatantly honest, I was in modified classes in school and struggled with a reading comprehension disability. I couldn’t string a sentence together to save my life.

I’m an avid reader of comic books and that helped me with my comprehension problem. I loved Stephen King and Anne Rice stories and always found myself nose deep in one of their novels.

I think, in a strange sort of way, that was the beginning of my training to learn how to write. When I began to think about publication, I wanted a pulse to find out what others thought of my writing. I joined the Critique Circle online where other writers comment on your story and help guide you. There were two big things I had to learn about other writers while I was there. 1) Most writers really want to help. 2) The advice you get is not always good.

What drew you to writing horror, or more specifically, about death?

It is purely driven by my fascination and fear. I actually don’t categorize my writing within the Thanatology Series as horror. I like to classify it as psychological suspense, thrillers. I think people have pigeonholed it as horror because of the psychological torment my characters go through. I’d classify my other novels, White River Monster and The Devil Tree, as horror. Ice Canyon Monster is an educational thriller suspense. I write in these other categories to give myself a brain break from the complexity of the Thanatology Series.

Since we are in October, and it revolves around all things haunted, is Halloween your favorite holiday?

Halloween is a fun holiday to me. I love to see the kids dressed up and creating a sense of neighborhood friendliness that has changed much since I was a kid. I would have to say though that Christmas is my favorite holiday. It reminds me of my father who passed away 7 years ago. 

O.K. I have to ask. What is your favorite horror film and what makes a good horror story?

My favorite horror film would have to be JAWS. Is that even horror? If it’s not, when I was a kid and saw that, I didn’t want to go anywhere near the ocean. I kind of still have the image of a stinking shark biting me and dragging me out to sea.

And what makes a good horror story? Suspense! Lots of it. Not cheap scares, but genuine suspense. Capture that, like in the movie The Sixth Sense, and you’ve hit a home run.

Is there anything overdone in this genre?

Cheap scares. I definitely try to avoid that at all costs. I also feel it is extremely important to come up with unique ideas. I feel when people learn of Alister’s plight in The Cursed Man, or Sariel in The Lurking Man, or even Leo in The Sinful Man, they’re going to find out these situations are unique. I refuse to put something out that doesn’t offer something to the reader.

When does your film release and how can people see the film?

The film releases this Halloween at the Fine Arts Theater in Beverly Hills, CA. The film will be shown in the other Laemmle Theaters and showtimes and dates will be announced soon. I’ll post those announcements on my website.

Any other news you’d like to share with fans?

That they can expect to see The Devil Tree on the big screen, too. I’ll also be co-writing another movie with James L. Perry, the producer and director of The Cursed Man, based off of one of his ideas. He’s looking to film sometime in 2017. I’ll announce more as things become more solidified. 

The filming of keith-rommelhis 3rd novel, The Sinful Man, is set to begin early 2017.

The Cursed Man, The Lurking Man, and other novels by Keith Rommel, along with tickets to the premier of The Cursed Man, are available at sunburypress.com

You can find out more about Keith Rommel on his website keithrommel.com

Sontag’s “The Silver Coin” is the third book of the “Ancient Elements” historical YA series

SAN JOSE, Calif. — Sunbury Press has released The Silver Coin, Marie Sontag’s historical young adult novel that is the third volume in the Ancient Elements series.

About the Book:
The Mycenaean captain laughed and addressed his prisoners. “By the time people realize you’re missing, you’ll all be slaves of Greek merchants or landowners. And I’ll be that much richer!” Sam swallowed hard. Now I’ll never find Uncle Zim. And who will want to buy a crippled slave? Numbness overtook him as he saw his hopes, like the sail of the Phoenician ship, go up in flames.

tsc_fcWhat Others Are Saying:
“Sontag’s Mediterranean world is a vivid one, and the story makes clear that even thousands of years ago, residents of the region were well traveled and knowledgeable about their realm. . . . individuals looking for curriculum-based fiction may find the book a valuable tool.” — Kirkus Reviews

“Sontag’s final book of her Ancient Element’s trilogy was an exhilarating conclusion to this Indiana Jones-like journey through the civilizations of the ancient middle eastern kingdoms. Students reading her books will effortlessly be educated, richly enhancing the core curriculum they are learning in their middle school classes.” — Jean Fujiki, Library Media Clerk, Cupertino, CA

“Sontag once again delivers heart stopping excitement as Samsuluna embarks on his next adventure. A masterful work of historical fiction that brings the ancient past to life. You will not be disappointed!” — Roberta Hendricks, Reading Intervention Specialist, TX

“The Silver Coin is so visual throughout, using conversation to move the characters forward in this third book of Dr. Sontag’s trilogy. My sixth grade students love to read her books!” — Susan Peers, Social Studies Teacher, San Jose, CA

Excerpt:
Peret, Season of Planting, 1777 BC – Mediterranean Sea off the coast of Egypt

boatFifteen-year-old Samsuluna fingered the remaining silver coin given to him by his adoptive father, Balashi. As the ship rocked beneath his sandaled feet, he eyed the ominous, black clouds gathering in the distance. “They say it takes about seven days to sail from Egypt to the Phoenician city of Tyre,” Samsuluna told his friend, Keret. “Once we get to Tyre, I’ll finally be able to complete my quest and reunite with my uncle, Zim-ri-lin.”

Seventeen-year-old Keret leaned over the Phoenician ship’s wicker railing to look at the dark sea that churned below. Keret then observed the swift moving clouds overhead. “I don’t know, Sam.” Keret shook his head. “It may take more than seven days to reach Phoenicia if a storm rolls in.”

Sam returned his coin to the leather pouch strapped around his neck and tucked the pouch beneath his tunic. “Well, at least I’ll have a place to call home again,” Sam said. “Since Balashi’s death . . .” Sam’s voice trailed off as he gazed at the clouds once again.

Sam turned his head when one of the Phoenician crewmen walked over and stood next to him, scanning the horizon. Something in the sailor’s intent gaze caused Sam to tighten his grip on the ship’s railing.

About the Author:
Dr. Marie Sontag taught middle school for over 15 years. She has a BA in Social Science, and an MA and PhD in Education. When on speaking events, she’s always accompanied by her authenticated 3,000-year-old bronze dagger, alabaster jar, and silver coin.

Books in the Ancient Elements Series:
Book One: The Bronze Dagger
Book Two: The Alabaster Jar
Book Three: The Silver Coin

Books in the Warsaw Rising Series
Book One: Rising Hope
Available Soon:
Book Two: A Door of Hope
Book Three: A Banner of Hope

The Silver Coin
Authored by Marie Sontag
List Price: $9.99
5.5″ x 8.5″ (13.97 x 21.59 cm)
Black & White on Cream paper
140 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620067987
ISBN-10: 1620067986
BISAC: Juvenile Fiction / Historical / Ancient Civilizations

Coming soon on Kindle

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/The-Silver-Coin-97816200…

1913 Calumet copper mining strike backdrop for Timmerman’s young adult novel

CALUMET, Mich. — Sunbury Press has released My Brother’s Mountain, John Timmerman’s historical young adult novel about life in Calumet, Michigan in 1913 during tense economic times.

My Brother's MountainAbout the Book:
Davey O’Brien and his friends are just trying to get through seventh grade at the Calumet & Hecla school for miners’ children.  But trouble won’t leave them alone.  Conflict with the “townies”, sons and daughters of mine bosses and store owners, is one thing.  But then the miners go on strike, food becomes scarce during awful winter storms, and life itself grows uncertain as the miners square off against the owners’ vigilante thugs.

Excerpt:
September 24, 1912

I had put my life in the hands of a madman.

He stood beside me, carrot-colored hair tangled up in curls like a nest of snakes. His shoulders stretched the shirt and sweater to the point of bursting. “And remember. Not a word of this to anyone. Ever,” he said.

His name was Robert O’Brien, and he’s my brother. I can’t deny it. Even though I have dark hair and dark blue eyes instead of green. I was skinny as a birch sapling, and about half as strong. I couldn’t see worth anything either. Right now I felt positively weak and half blind.

“Ready, Davey?” Robert asked. “It’s not going to be daylight forever.”

Rough caskets for victims of the Italian Hall disaster

Rough caskets for victims of the Italian Hall disaster

“I’m coming,” I said.

I was on my knees getting a drink at the creek. All around me were footprints of animals that had crept down the forest trail during the night. The deer prints were the deepest—the big does more cautious, the small fawn prints dotted all around like dizzy sailors.

I felt like one of those fawns, spindly-legged and trembly.

My mistake was the way I leaned down to get a quick drink from the creek before I followed Robert the rest of the way up the trail. I saw Mount Baldy perfectly reflected in the water, ready for me to climb.

I didn’t want to do it. But Robert stood beside me like an oak tree with curly orange leaves daring me to go back down the trail.

“Come on. Don’t sit there guzzling water or you’ll never make it up.”

I wasn’t guzzling. I was staring at the upside-down reflection of Mount Baldy and was thinking that I really, really didn’t need to be a King of the Mountain.

At least not yet. That thing was a monster.

But, this would be my only chance this year. Snow could start any day. I mean heavy snow. And it wouldn’t be gone until May. By then Robert would have turned eighteen, left school, and gone to work in the mines.

I stood up. “Okay,” I said.

He looked at me. “This first part is easy,” he said. “Just an uphill walk. But you have to learn the trail. That’s your job.”

“All right. I hear you.” I hate it when a big brother sounds like a big brother.

“And remember,” he said, “I show you once. If you can’t remember, you don’t deserve to be a King of the Mountain. Brother or not.”

This was the thing. There was only one way to learn the trail. Someone had to lead you, showing all the weird markings used to point the way. If you failed, you were cast out of The Kings forever. You had one chance.

I had known that sooner or later Robert would take me. I was just hoping it would be later. Much later. Like four or five years later when maybe I’d have more than two pounds of muscle in my body and a set of glasses good enough to keep me from bumping into trees and tripping over acorns.

So here we were—working our way along the forest trail to the ledge. The trail started heading up more sharply. My feet kept slipping, and I kept grabbing onto tree trunks to keep my balance. At one point my feet just slid out from under me on a patch of leaves and loose stones. Splat! Right on my face and a wicked little cut on the palm of one hand. Where the trees began to thin out, the wind slanted in from Lake Superior and drove things like icicles right down my throat into my stomach. My fingers were turning blue-white. Big old Robert just kept stalking along ahead of me, as if the whole world wasn’t about to turn to ice. I wish he would fall or something, just to prove he’s not such a big shot.

Fall only about four or five feet, of course. He still had to get me back down. I kept climbing as fast as I could just to stay warm.

I felt like I had been climbing for three days straight. I was sucking at the cold wind to catch my breath. I looked up to see how far I had to go. A long shelf of rock hung out above us.

“Are we at the top?” I asked.

About the Author:
John Timmerman is a former college professor and the author of many books and short stories.  He lives with his wife in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

My Brother’s Mountain
Authored by John Timmerman
List Price: $9.99
5.5″ x 8.5″ (13.97 x 21.59 cm)
Black & White on Cream paper
160 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620067093
ISBN-10: 1620067099
BISAC: Juvenile Fiction / Historical / United States / 20th Century

Also available on Kindle

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/My-Brothers-Mountain-978…

New York City chef cooks up counterfeiting scheme in Barsky’s “Hatched”

NEW YORKAug. 26, 2016 –  Sunbury Press has released Hatched, Robert F Barsky’s novel about a famous restaurant on Wall Street and the financial scheme cooked-up therein.

Hatched_fcAbout the Book:
A well-respected chef in New York City has decided to fulfill a lifelong dream, to open a restaurant in the smart Wall Street area of the City that is devoted entirely to “eggy” creations. Working with an inspired architect, John erects a restaurant in the shape of a Fabergé egg, inspired by those remarkable masterpieces that were offered each year by the Czar to his beloved wife, leading up to the Russian Revolution. Fabergé Restaurant becomes ‘the’ destination for the wealthiest of NYC clients, but it’s also the place where a plan is Hatched by three former college roommates to counterfeit billions of dollars and shake the United States economy to its very yolk. A rollicking novel filled with intrigue, passion and voluptuous egg recipes, Hatched is a sumptuous treat.

Excerpt:
Immaculate imperfection. Silent to the touch, but teeming with all of the potential that can be excited by fertile stimulation. From up close, it seems painted with an imperfectly mixed, white gouache upon an uneven surface; from further back, it is an oblong globe, steadied from the center to the periphery to withstand the gentle swaying of the nest, the wind, the rain. The shell is solid, protective, and yet, always, and secretly, vulnerable. It’s hardy and well-insulated inside, but once expelled into the world of knocks and piercings, the yolk suffers and thereby reveals the single weakness of a shell pervious to rigid surfaces, its soft and mottled form suddenly blistered, cracked, dented, revealing tender, white flesh within, but concealing a core, an essence, a willing soul now and forever unfulfilled. Never to consume, the yolk now settles, haughtily, awaiting the fate of consumption. . . .

Suddenly, its very essence is reminiscent of Sunday morning, when Dad would for once sleep in and, that accomplished, would awaken the household with ‘Rise and shine!,’ accompanied by the sizzling sound of butter caressing and then solidifying the gooey translucence into white, the bulbous yellow to a globe and a world unto itself. The buttery pan, once heated, makes golden magic of this bulging, yellow world, now perched atop a gooey throne that, from the end towards the center, grows into a plastic base. The battered shells now ruthlessly discarded reveal untarnished and impeccable interiors, smooth walls now dripping with the liquid white remains, having for their trouble preserved the yellow center of the world, bulging, nearly heaving, now intact, defying gravity’s pull and begging. . . .

“Would you like another one?”

Robert-Barsky-for-webpageAbout the Author:
Robert Franklin Barsky
is a professor and Chair of the French and Italian Department. He holds joint appointments with the English Department, the Center for Latin American Studies, and the Programs in Jewish Studies European Studies, and American Studies at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee. He is an expert on Noam Chomsky, literary theory, convention refugees, immigration and refugee law, borders, work through the Americas, and Montreal. His biography of Chomsky titled Noam Chomsky: A Life of Dissent was published in 1997 by MIT Press, followed in 2007 by The Chomsky Effect: A Radical Works Beyond the Ivory Tower, and then in 2011 by Zellig Harris: From American Linguistics to Socialist Zionism, all published by MIT Press. He has another book forthcoming:Undocumented Immigrants in an Era of Arbitrary Law (Routledge Law, 2015).

Hatched
Authored by Robert F Barsky
List Price: $19.95
Paperback: 284 pages
Publisher: Sunbury Press, Inc. (August 17, 2016)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1620067404
ISBN-13: 978-1620067406
Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.6 x 9 inches
Shipping Weight: 14.7 ounces
FIC002000 FICTION / Action & Adventure
FIC050000 FICTION / Crime
FIC016000 FICTION / Humorous / General
FIC037000 FICTION / Political

Also available on Kindle

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Hatched-9781620067406.htm

Union captures Vicksburg! “I can’t spare this man. He fights!” says Lincoln of US Grant.

tlg_fcVICKSBURG, Miss. — Sunbury Press has released Taking Lady Gibraltar: Grant’s Convoluted Tour de Force in the West, Dick Schwirian’s historical novel about the capture of Vicksburg, Mississippi by Union forces in 1863.

About the Book:
Taking of Lady Gibraltar is about one of the major events of the Civil War, the campaign to seize Vicksburg by Union forces under Ulysses S. Grant. Before 1863, Vicksburg, situated on high bluffs overlooking the Mississippi River, was thought to be impregnable. Grant created a new reality. The capture of Vicksburg and its garrison was, if not the signature northern victory of the Civil War, at least among the top contenders. It denied the Confederacy free access to the Mississippi River, it split the South in two, and, perhaps most importantly, it ultimately persuaded Abraham Lincoln to appoint Grant commander of all Union armies. In the words of the sixteenth president: “I can’t spare this man. He fights.”

It may be inaccurate to say that Grant won the Civil War for the North, but there is truth in the claim. His success, first in the west and later in the east, was phenomenal. Was he a military genius? Probably not. But he had a keen sense for the opportunistic moment and the fortitude to pursue a course of action relentlessly, once chosen. The Taking of Lady Gibraltar illustrates these qualities—and some shortcomings—in an exciting and stimulating read for anyone who loves Civil War history and historical fiction.

Battle of Vicksburg

Battle of Vicksburg

Excerpt:
April 7, 1862 – The Shiloh Battlefield

On the second day of battle, Union skirmishers began forming their lines at 3:00 AM and were ordered to find the enemy. They did. The evening before, P.G.T. Beauregard had entertained great hopes for taking the day for the Confederacy but was unaware of the Union reinforcements under Don Carlos Buell, who were then arriving from Nashville under cover of darkness. Beauregard had lost half his men on the first day of battle; Grant had gained twenty thousand more. The fighting on the second day was intense but brief. By 4:00 PM, Beauregard ordered a general withdrawal to Corinth, Mississippi in the middle of a cold, relentless hailstorm, some of the hailstones as big as eggs and as hard as musket balls.

Had he wanted to, Grant could have pursued and destroyed Beauregard’s exhausted army. Pursuit of a defeated foe was, after all, a maxim of military tactical manuals. However, pursuit was an undertaking that his own bone-weary, mud-caked army might not be able to sustain. They were tired too.

About the Author:
Dick Schwirian resides in the South Hills of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania with his wife Jo.

Taking Lady Gibraltar: Grant’s Convoluted Tour de Force in the West
Authored by Dick Schwirian
List Price: $19.95
6″ x 9″ (15.24 x 22.86 cm)
Black & White on Cream paper
452 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620066508
ISBN-10: 1620066505
BISAC: Fiction / War & Military

Also available on Kindle

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Taking-Lady-Gibraltar-97…

Mental illness disrupts a Spanish family in New Mexico until a brave father steps forward

LAS VEGAS, N.M. — Sunbury Press has released Mela Suse Vigil Duran Carvalko’s memoir of her childhood titled Maybe Tomorrow.

About the Book:
A FAMILY THAT CONFRONTS THE FORCES OF MENTAL ILLNESS, AND LEARNS THAT NO BURDEN IS SO HEAVY AS TO DEFEAT AN ETERNAL LOVE.

mt_fcQuite apart from other memoirs, the author captivates the reader’s attention, by painting a portrait of  mental illness through the eyes of a child.  As a child growing up during the 40s and 50s, in the rural Spanish farming communities of New Mexico/Colorado, she recounts her father’s courage and refusal to accept the finality of his wife’s mental illness,  and how he single-handedly raised four daughters, teaching them what it means to survive, drawing strength from the pride of self-worth, and the humility of self-reliance.

Excerpt:
I have come full circle to the land of my father’s birth, Rociada, New Mexico, where I breathe in the aspirations of my ancestors, where I hear the swish of their scythe against the wheat, their plough turning a stubborn, bounteous earth, where I see the rutted and hooved reliefs of wagons and beasts, burdens, which led directly to a remarkable life, one guided by a dream of an angel sitting on my shoulder, watching over me.

The screams frightened me beyond verbal description, but this fright was quickly supplanted by the even greater one of not knowing where I was going and what waited for me at the top. We climbed the metal grated stairs, each step causing vibrations that made me feel they would collapse at any moment. The higher we climbed, the louder the screams became. I was afraid to go on, but afraid of what was behind me. As we ascended, my heart beat faster with each step. I felt sick to my stomach wondering what evil waited for me, but I never complained, and did what was expected of me. By the age of three I had learned to control my emotions, and as I grew older, I found that self-control in the face of the unknown would help me survive.

As we neared the top, I could hear doors creak open in front of us and slam shut behind us. When we reached the final step, we came to a lobby with a long hallway. The door closings reverberated off the high ceiling and masonry walls; harsh lights overhead reflected off shiny, off-white, dirty-beige, and pea-green walls. The floors were covered with hard linoleum squares, worn, scuffed, and cracked, and though polished to a high sheen, every square was embedded with the dirt of half a century.

About the Author:
MELA SUŚE VIGIL DURAN CARVALKO has spent many years investigating the genealogy of Spanish families that settled in San Miguel/Mora counties, New Mexico. In addition to documenting her accounts of the life and times during the mid-twentieth century, she devotes time as an artist and musician. She studied art at Sacred Heart University and mentored under impressionist artist Albert Werner.  Currently she lives between New Mexico and the east coast with her husband, three cats and dog Leila.

Maybe Tomorrow
Authored by Mela Suse Vigil Duran Carvalko
List Price: $19.95
6″ x 9″ (15.24 x 22.86 cm)
Black & White on Cream paper
280 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620067079
ISBN-10: 1620067072
BISAC: Family & Relationships / Dysfunctional Families

Also available on Kindle

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Maybe-Tomorrow-978162006…