Littlestown resident pens 3rd novel in the Langdon Trilogy about civil rights in America

SUNBURY PRESS BOOKS

GETTYSBURG, Pa. — Sunbury Press has released C James Gilbert’s A Second Revolution, the third book in the Langdon Trilogy about civil rights in America throughout history.

About the Book:
At the end of the Great War in November, 1918, Jim Langdon, of Langdon Plantation in Macon, Georgia, is preparing to continue his late father’s work for the full legal equality of Black Americans. Although slavery had been abolished fifty-two years earlier, constitutional rights and guaranteed protection under the law holds no meaning for black citizens.

With his wife, Elizabeth, by his side and Almighty God leading the way, Jim immerses himself in the civil rights movement with a dream of showing the nation that black or white, we are all brothers and sisters.

A long road with the possibility of so much to gain in the end is still a long road, especially when racism and hatred are…

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Alan Mindell’s “The Closer” is Sunbury Press’s best-selling novel of all time

SUNBURY PRESS BOOKS

Mechanicsburg, PA — Sunbury Press, the trade publisher based in Pennsylvania, has released its list of top selling novels of all time:

  1. The Closerby Alan Mindell — R. A. Dickey was the first knuckleball pitcher to ever win a coveted Cy Young Award–despite spending most of his career in the minor leagues.  Terry Landers, also a knuckleballer, is Dickey`s fictional counterpart in The Closer.  The main difference, aside from winning the Cy Young, is that at age thirty-three, Terry has never played in the majors. Once he finally gets his chance, what follows is the heartwarming story of his impact both on the pitching mound and with a family in distress. “The Closer is an Award Winning book. Written with extraordinary compassion and deep attunement to the human psyche, Alan deftly defines the keys to a positive mind and winning the Game of Life. A book that is sure…

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“Planet Jesus v1: Flesh & Blood” in book stores

SUNBURY PRESS BOOKS

Sunbury Press has released Flesh and Blood, Doug and Shaun Brode’s first installment of his new Planet Jesus series.

About the Book:
“The PLANET JESUS Trilogy is just CRAZY – in the most WONDERFUL and CREATIVE way. Highly recommended – a must-read!” — Rod Lurie, director/writer/producer (KILLING REAGAN, COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF, STRAW DOGS, RESURRECTING THE CHAMP, NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH, etc.)

Where The Twilight Zone meets The New Testament is where ‘Flesh and Blood,’ the first volume in the PLANET JESUS trilogy, takes place. In his latest novel, Douglas Brode, now collaborating with his son Shaun L., retells the old story of The Christ with a new twist: The angel Gabriel, who descended from the stars to impregnate Mary, wife of Joseph, with a Divine Child was actually an ancient alien. His purpose was to create a high-level hybrid race so that civilization on earth could rapidly advance.

In “Book One:…

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Keith Rommel’s “Thanatology” series collecting awards in Hollywood on the festival circuit

SUNBURY PRESS BOOKS

c-mw-laurelsHOLLYWOOD, CA — The first two books in Keith Rommel’s Thanatology series (Sunbury Press), The Cursed Manand The Lurking Man, have been adapted into feature films and have recently begun their festival runs. Rommel along with director/producer James L. Perry wrote the screenplay for The Cursed Man, and with executive producer Maritza Brikisak for The Lurking Man. Each film took top awards for their screenplay. Now the powerful stories and acting are turning heads. To date, the two films and the novels combined have garnished 60+ awards,  the start of what could be truly spectacular. The film festivals continue throughout most of the year, bringing with them many opportunities. Having won ‘Best Book of the Year’, ‘Best Feature Screenplay’, ‘Best Ensemble’, ‘Best Narrative Feature Film(s)’ and wins in many other categories, the films are a direct reflection of the full length novels and are gaining much attention.

lm_with-laurelsRommel…

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CAN SCIENCE FICTION SAVE THE EARTH?

DAN BLOOM HOPES “CLI-FI” WILL SWAY NON-BELIEVERS

By James Sullivan

In the 1957 pulp classic On the Beach, the novelist and aeronautical engineer Nevil Shute imagined a horrific scenario in the aftermath of World War III. A small group of survivors clustered in southern Australia await the arrival of a deadly radioactive cloud, contemplating the near-certainty that the rest of humanity has already perished.

It’s a terrifying prospect, of course, which is why the book has retained its grip on the public imagination, adapted twice as a movie and, in 2008, as a BBC radio broadcast. Dan Bloom first read On the Beach in a high school English class in 1967. It gave him Cold War nightmares.

Bloom was panicked all over again a decade ago when he read the doomsday predictions of the British environmentalist James Lovelock. Writing in the Independent, Lovelock envisioned an earthly population wildly diminished by massive climate change—not hundreds of years in the future, but by the end of this century.

“I was in a deep funk for about a month,” says Bloom, a former news reporter who has been teaching English in Taiwan for 20 years. Lovelock, the scientist, has since boomeranged, accusing himself of “alarmism” and emboldening gleeful climate skeptics. Bloom, meanwhile, has tempered his own pessimism: he thinks we’ve got 500 years, “30 generations of people, to keep working on this problem.”

While he’s still here on the potentially dying planet (Bloom is 70), he’s looking to literature to help convince his fellow human beings about the ominous implications of carbon emissions.

“I’m looking for the On the Beach of climate change,” Bloom says. “I’m looking for somebody somewhere in the world who can tell a story that has the power of On the Beach so it shocks people into awareness.”

A native of Springfield, Massachusetts, Bloom says he became an environmentalist while studying at Tufts University in the late 1960s. He read Ecotopia, Ernest Callenbach’s cult novel about an attempt to create a green utopia on the West Coast, when it came out in 1975. In 1980, he tried to find an agent for a novel he wanted to write about a huge flood that submerges New York City. What did he learn from that experience?

“You need to be a genius to write a novel,” he says. “I’m not a genius.”

It wasn’t until he saw the 2004 disaster film The Day After Tomorrow, which imagined the sudden arrival of a new Ice Age, that Bloom started thinking about the power of storytelling to rally like-minded citizens concerned for the future of life on Earth. A few years later, he coined a phrase: “cli-fi,” or climate fiction.

He’s committed to promoting the idea that well-told stories are and will be critical to raise awareness about the implications of climate change. Unpaid and unaffiliated, Bloom has devoted the last several years to contacting writers, editors and literary gatekeepers, hoping to draw attention to his notion of cli-fi.

“I’m basically a PR person,” he says.

His idea of a genre for speculative climate fiction found some traction a few years ago when it was endorsed on Twitter by Margaret Atwood, the novelist whose science fiction trilogy, capped by MaddAddam (2013), dealt with a corrupt anti-environmentalist. Bloom acknowledges and applauds the broader genre of eco-fiction, popularized during the rise of the environmental movement in the 1970s and epitomized by such titles as Edward Abbey’s The Monkey Wrench Gang and, more recently, Barbara Kingsolver’s Flight Behavior.

But he’d like to think of cli-fi as “an independent, stand-alone genre,” restricted to those works of fiction that consider the specific problem of human-made global warming. 

That makes for a limited category. Yet there are examples as far back as Jules Verne, who imagined—in the 1860s—a future Paris struggling with a precipitous drop in temperature. That was a plot point in Verne’s “lost” novel Paris in the Twentieth Century, which went unpublished until 1994.

Given the speed with which the phrase “climate change” (which actually dates back at least 50 years) has overtaken the environmental discussion in recent years, it’s perhaps not surprising that there’s been a surge in books that could be called cli-fi. Among them are Marcel Theroux’s Far North (2009), which the Washington Post called “the first great cautionary fable of climate change”; Ian McEwan’s Solar (2010), which won a UK literary award for comic fiction; and Nathaniel Rich’s Odds Against Tomorrow (2014), which imagines New York City flooded by a colossal hurricane.

These are all examples of quality fiction that happen to take climate change as a shared theme. “As far as I’m concerned,” Bloom says, “cli-fi needs character-driven stories. It shouldn’t be propaganda novels.”

A good story, he believes, will have the potential to attract not only climate activists, but also some of the deniers: “The whole point is to reach people with emotions, not just preach to the choir.”

Next up, he thinks, is the forthcoming novel from the Hugo Award-winning science fiction veteran Kim Stanley Robinson. Due in March, New York 2140 submerges the great city under the water of the rising tides. “Every street became a canal,” explains the promotional blurb. “Every skyscraper an island.” How will the city’s residents—the lower and upper classes, quite literally—cope?

The book, Bloom thinks, might be the next phenomenon in the genre he created.

“I think it’s going to blow the lid off.”

Perry County Council of the Arts and Sunbury Press sponsor short story anthology

SUNBURY PRESS BOOKS

MECHANICSBURG, Pa. — Sunbury Press has released Strange Magic, a short story compilation from writers in the A Novel Idea Workshop sponsored by Perry County Council of the Arts. Catherine Jordan was the editor.

From PCCA:
sm_fcIn the late 1980s, I wrote a nifty little novel and signed on with a veteran agent who peddled it all over New York City.

I papered the wall of my office with scores of rejection letters, licked my wounds, and went on to other pursuits. But I always wondered why my story went nowhere.

Fast forward thirty years. In collaboration with the Perry County Council of the Arts, author Don Helin assembled a stellar faculty of successful, published authors to teach A Novel Idea, a year-long class for aspiring novelists. I signed on for that first year, half to represent PCCA, and…

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“The Crossers” series continues with “Return to the Valley”

SUNBURY PRESS BOOKS

MECHANICSBURG, Pa. — Sunbury Press has released “Return to the Valley,” Terry Ray’s fifth installment in “The Crossers” series.

About the Book:
crossers5_fcReturn to the Valley picks up the story, ten years after the conclusion of the epic American Classic Series, Crossing the Valley. The main character, Marty Chapman, has settled into a happy, normal, family life as a college professor in a small town in Kansas and seems to have finally found contentment. As in the original series, however, Marty is not destined for such a life.

This continuing epic, once again, traverses the complete spectrum of human emotions and life experiences that will leave the reader transfixed and in awe.

This story winds its way through romantic love and family bliss, to the revealing inside story of the treacherous, back-stabbing, real world of university faculty, to pure evil, blackmailing co-eds, homicide and the anatomy of a sensational…

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